HO UNA VOGLIA DI ANDARE A PARIGI – Nocturnals for voice and electronics on Amelia Rosselli - Tempo Reale

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    HO UNA VOGLIA DI ANDARE A PARIGI – Nocturnals for voice and electronics on Amelia Rosselli

    HO UNA VOGLIA DI ANDARE A PARIGI – Nocturnals for voice and electronics on Amelia Rosselli

    Saturday 14 November, 21.00hrs, PARC Performing Arts Centre
    HO UNA VOGLIA DI ANDARE A PARIGI
    Nocturnal for voice and electronics on
    Amelia Rosselli

    With: Maria Caterina Frani
    Live music: Simone Faraci
    Lighting consultant: Roberto Cafaggini
    Direction: Maria Caterina Frani
    Created with the contribution of Tempo Reale’s KATE program
    Image: Massimo Conti

    It’s a rhythm, an accent, a concert, a dance. It’s a desire. It’s an exhibition.

    It’s a project born from the musical suggestions in the poetry of Amelia Rosselli. Poet, editor, music scholar, she was born in France and lived in England and the United States before settling once again in Italy. Lacking a mother tongue, she wrote without a pause, guided by musical sounds, by metric structures, and by the search of a new form for poetry.

    As a cosmopolitan, Rosselli used her writing to investigate the variables of language, a trilingual practice where language itself is freed from the wear of habit, and the world of sound that emerges is governed by contamination.

    Coming from this context, “Ho una voglia di andare a Parigi” (“I have a longing to go to Paris”) experiments a dialogue with an actual musical composition, where words swerve and explode, opening to new landscapes of sound. Within this flow, presence is complete and the vision that emerges is the result of a blending of elements. Like a concert.

    The show starts from the structure of a concert, with the poems being revealed as songs in a setlist, and just like in a concert what is represented is not a single artist’s album, but extracts from the complete works of the author. The dramaturgical construction is therefore unlinked from Amelia Rosselli’s biography or bibliography, instead adopting a pace that adapts to rhythm without dwelling on meaning. What it means is less important than the act of saying it, and so once again the private experience of poetry is delivered to the public in a sonic, mundane, and profane key. The literary components blend with the sound environment, and the result fuses into the composition of new possible scenarios.